Are hospitals and provider health systems where innovation goes to die? The Subtlety of Influence and Partnering for Innovation

Politicians, businessmen, and even housewives ask the questions: “Why is healthcare so complicated? Why can’t it be simpler?”

They even demand: “I need care, tell me the price, and don’t make me wait so long.”

Amazon knows me as a member of Prime and maintains my information securely in the cloud. Amazon knows where I live with my saved data/information and then delivers to my house in three days or even less. They know me. “Why do I have to keep filling out the same paperwork at my hospital every time I arrive? It is my regular appointment with my same doctor and the same office and hospital. Why don’t they know me by now?”

Apple has all those apps I can just download from the app store for service, education, entertainment or every day conveniences.

“If physicians and hospitals are so sophisticated with all their expensive equipment, why can’t I just get an app to simply make an appointment, review my bill and pay utilizing PayPal?”

“I’ll tell you what causes a real headache, trying to pay a bill after a stay at my hospital.”

Finally, “Why can’t I just download my healthcare information and take it with me wherever I go?”

Industry-wide, we providers are internally focused on creating results; too often myopic in our approach. Ongoing comparisons within the healthcare industry are continuous and judicial yet we restrict our world toward outmaneuvering only the local competitors; however, our patients are judging us by the expectations created outside of healthcare through their engagement in the broader world of technology and business.

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Hats off to the standalone hospital CEO Why I find Rural/Small/Stand-Alone-Hospital CEOs so Impressive.

“Stand alone” hospital presidents provide a great deal to admire.

I was the lead in a recent strategic retreat and the CEO was incredibly impressive as I watched her interact with her board, her physician leadership and her administrative team. Once again it rekindled my awareness of how small hospital CEOs have to do it all. They are the engaged in the community, lead in the facility, influence the physicians, head Human Resources, know all the staff by name and can even be involved in the revenue cycle, IT and compliance departments. There is very little this CEO isn’t aware of from governmental changes to the one physician or nurse who leaves unexpectedly. There is no cushion. There is no room for error. It is a pure survivability issue. They must know everything and be involved in everything. As they look around them, there are few, if any, people to delegate to within the organization. They have the community depending on them as one of the key employers if not the largest of their city. System CEOs on the other hand have delegation capabilities and can look to corporate for support and capital. While a smaller hospital CEO bears the brunt of this responsibility.

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In Praise of Corporate Tension

“Corporate will be here next week to help…”

“Corporate is sending out a team in person to review the project.”

“Corporate is coming out for a visit.”

These words can immobilize the most courageous of hearts. Many at the clinical sites believe corporate exists to disrupt and provide self-enhancement for the corporate individual making the demand. The incoming request often appears as a consistent disruptor to the local individual who is focused on the hospital, clinic or community issues. As a non-corporate individual, you are at the site addressing immediate and multiple priorities. The demands can range from concerns for improving patient care, addressing colleague concerns or responding to the corporate enhanced financial issues to name just a few of the more common daily agenda items. In fact, you may even be reacting to a situation affecting the greater importance (?) of your immediate supervisory interacting environment (i.e. keeping your local boss happy). Whatever the corporate demand at the time, it can seem to distract from the work necessary to be successful at the site. Furthermore, from the limited view in field, the request can sometimes make no sense as to its timing or priority except “Home Office needs it now.”

The tension between the entities in the field and the corporate power is real. The euphemism of “Corporate,” with all of its priority setting, sweeping powers, and down-flowing time demands can cause untold tension and disruption at the sites. However, corporate has its own demands and in the final measure is often made up of people just attempting to survive and succeed. Good leaders are conscientious individuals balancing competing demands, shifting priorities, and seemingly continuously adjusting metrics driven by someone else’s “higher-up” tinkering. Both sections of the organization contain people searching for a positive impact. Same organization. Different pressures. Competing language. How does that language sound as a result of differing views? Let’s take a look and listen in: Read Full Article.

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The Cultural Leadership effect -- it starts with you

The leadership team is responsible for strategy. It is a major portion of our many meeting agendas. We have all seen or created the list of items and our strategy focus may vary from how to enhance our service line growth, to retaining and recruiting more nurses, or focusing on the improvement necessary to boost the patient scores and much, much more: however, as leaders we all know what must always be forefront on our strategic agenda, taking care of our employees.

How many times have you seen where the Administrative Team gets together, decides they are all going to Round together, and their assistants (with repetitive internal mirth) agonizingly make the schedule, coordinating whereby everyone can Round together. It lasts for a few months, weeks or even never gets completely off the ground despite the many studies showing its benefit. It is not out of leadership neglect, but the daily re-prioritization battle that necessitates our lives. Nevertheless, the focus on your employees must always take precedence.

The questions must then be asked: How is this precedence displayed? How do you show you care about your employees? Read Full Article.

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Five things every CEO needs to do

It is a truth. As CEOs, we are pulled in many directions. The incessant priorities, though seemingly always valuable, will consistently distract us from our most meaningful impact. How does a CEO maintain their focus and discipline on what is important when everything is significant? They must focus on what is central to the organization’s success. The following five imperatives will aid in this journey:

1) Visible Listener:

The CEO must be a good listener who spends time greeting, listening and positively interacting with the individuals on the floors and in the clinics. Ninety-Five percent of your time should be spent listening. Hearing from the people doing the work who can keep you informed of the issues they are solving through the work-around of their own ingenuity. You have an opportunity to develop relationships, listen for trends, solve problems and gain credibility as a CEO who cares about the people enough to make them a priority in your busy day. Read Full Article.https://www.rodneyreider.com/blog/2019/2/7/five-things-every-ceo-needs-to-do

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